Aspiring Garden Designer | current healthcare admin | ex-teacher

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Otters, owls and opportunities

Otters, owls and opportunities

What are your views on Fate? I’m quite a strong believer in the idea that opportunities are laid at your feet, though it’s up to us as individuals to step out on each path or not.     Why do I say this? Well, the […]

Roots

Roots

How do you feel about your “roots”? Do they go deep in the place you live, or are you more uprooted? I’ve got quite extensive family roots, but they can be as much a burden as a blessing. I always used to say I’d never […]

Off the grid, on the map

Off the grid, on the map

Sometimes it’s easy to get swept away in the hustle and bustle, and the excitement of constant activity too. Sometimes it’s soothing just to relax, no plans, no deadlines. How many of us are guilty of forgetting that?

 

 

From Friday evening to Sunday night, the only plan Matt and I had were “getting off the grid”. Letting go of being live wires. A weekend in North Yorkshire was on the cards (as were other board games, although I think we only managed a few rounds of Connect Four). Ok, so Friday evening didn’t begin completely chilled. The SatNav took us directly through Leeds and out via Otley. Not the most straightforward route, though thankfully the Leeds roads were quiet.

 

 

In a way it added an extra layer of pleasure when we reached our destination finally, as we couldn’t wait just to relax. I cooked up a simple bruschetta with some tomatoes, onion, mushrooms, garlic and basil, plus slices of heated halloumi and dollops of balsamic glaze. We may have washed it down with a couple of bottles of prosecco…

 


 

Saturday was where it was at! We’ve had some brilliant days out visiting open gardens and National Trust estates over more recent months, and I would never tire of that. However, both of us love country walks, and that’s certainly what we got. Nothing revives the soul quite like a stroll over hill and dale, admiring the spectacular scenery.

 

Our walk took us out from Pateley Bridge, up the hill along a stretch of the Nidderdale Way and through small settlements such as Blazefield, Low Laithe and Glasshouses, before we returned to Pateley for a couple of pints at The Royal Oak pub.

 

 

Our halfway point, as such, was Brimham Rocks, a National Trust location. It’s all about the landscape. Amongst the trees, heather and wildflowers stand remarkable rock formations, ancient and sometimes mind-boggling in their anti-gravity feats. Check out Idol Rock, for example!

 

 

There’s a lovely little gift shop with a gallery space up above, and a small coffee bar in a separate outbuilding.

 

 

By the time we returned to our lodgings (for yet more prosecco), we’d walked around 10 miles. I have to say, it felt further, but I put that down to the constancy of our climbs. Unlike our usual walking weather, the sky was good to us, with just the occasional short shower and plenty of warm sunlight.

 

This clambering clematis, struggling for freedom from its overgrown garden confines, caught my eye…

 


 

 

…as did the spontaneity of being able to hire a llama companion in Nidderdale…

 


 

…and how plainly pretty is this row of terrace houses?

 


 

After a long day and a late night of, whoops, more boozing, Sunday morning was a welcome lazy lie-in. We followed this up with a steady jaunt across to Grassington for lunch in a quaint little tearoom/bistro called The Retreat. Its staff were absolutely some of the friendliest and most positive ever encountered, and we had the added bonus of chatting briefly in the courtyard with an Australian lady touring Europe and the U.K. with her partner. The food was delicious. I’d ordered a goats cheese and tomato panini with chips and salad, while Matt had a vegetarian lasagne which looked and smelt fantastic. Apparently it tasted just as great! Highly recommended to anybody visiting Grassington.

 


 

We followed up our lunch with a quick stop to glance in the unassuming entrance to Stump Cross Caverns, describing itself as a 30-40 minute walk through primordial caverns bedecked with fossilised remains. We had never heard of the place and were tempted to go in, but time was ticking on and we had to get back to Pateley Bridge… for scones! I’m adding the caverns to my wish list for a future adventure.

 


 

Where did we eat scones? At The Old Granary, a tearoom which gave you the impression it hadn’t altered in years and years and years. Nor would one want it to. The scones were exquisite too. I loved the fact they had a Gluten Free options – something I’m much more aware of these days as a colleague and her daughter are coeliac and are often on the lookout for suitable eateries.

 

 

Sunday evening was, for me, as brilliant a part of the weekend away as the long walk on Saturday afternoon. Why? Because Matt and I had a leisurely drive out towards the moors past Gouthwaite Reservoir, in time to watch the sky meld from pale blue through pink and purple to dusky deep hues. We came across a gorgeous little village called Ramsgill with its stately hotel…

 


 

…could see out towards Middlesbrough from one hilltop and gaze on a sea of lavender heathers up there…

 

…and stopped for a nippy nighttime walk around the lofty village of Middlesmoor.

 

 

Such a brilliant weekend, I didn’t want to head to bed on Sunday night, but work beckoned the next day and thus an early early start…

 

I hope you all had a lovely, relaxed weekend with some “off the grid” time. Now you’re back on it, feel free to subscribe to my blog or follow my social media =D

Not enough hours in the day

Not enough hours in the day

How can we add more hours to the day? A question I keep posing to myself regularly at the moment – the answer, of course, impossible. The reason for this pondering: I’ve found a new lease on life and there’s just so much out there […]

An eternal outlook

An eternal outlook

How often do you find yourself retracing steps from an earlier part of your life, sometimes without even realising it? Last weekend I met Matt out in Tideswell where we’d had our very first date. This Saturday I ended up taking Troy for a walk […]

Taking it easy around Tideswell

Taking it easy around Tideswell

Do you find that every now and then you just need a totally chilled weekend?

That’s what I was in need of this time, and that is what I got. Not boring or empty, but relaxed and satisfying. I’ve been chock full of cold since Tuesday evening, and I’m still today experiencing the occasional snuffle, sneeze or cough. I needed a less strenuous couple of days.

It was the first weekend in a while where I haven’t driven over to Matt’s straight from my work experience with Bestall & Co., something I normally don’t mind doing, but which would have taken it out of me this weekend. I don’t know if you ever suffer with this when having a cold, but I always end up feeling slightly tipsy; my head feels light and disorientated when I move it while suffering a cold. So driving is fun!

So what has this past weekend involved?

On Friday evening I visited my sister at her place to discuss life, drop off a rather belated birthday present for her, and have a look over a couple of areas of her back garden which she’d like my input with – something I’ll move onto doing after typing this up (it’s Sunday morning as I write).

Afterwards I hurried home to get changed and grab a taxi over to my friend Chris’ surprise 30th birthday party, brilliantly organised by my school friend Rach. Shame that Chris slipped out of the pub earlier than the deadline for guests to all arrive, so the SURPRISE! part was a little unsurprising. He seemed to enjoy himself nonetheless, as did I. It was fantastic catching up with old friends and meeting some new people too, despite me having to leave quite early to avoid making myself more ill again.

Following a relatively early night in bed for a Friday, I was up and about Saturday tidying and then driving over to meet Matt in Tideswell, town home to the “Cathedral of the Peak”, the parish church of St John the Baptist.

I was ridiculously early (a trait of mine), but it worked out fine as I went for a little stroll alone around the town centre, passing up some side streets I’ve never bothered with before. I loved the following rows of houses with their floral fiesta (the photo sadly doesn’t do it justice):

The bench in the bottom left of the above photo is in more detail below, with its curious little notice which I imagine relates to the fact it’s not the sturdiest looking of benches!

I walked past this old chapel, now converted into what I assume is holiday cottage-type lodgings, but the sign left me wondering if it was a rentable function space instead/as well:

At the end of the same street you came face to face with the following little white gate, and I wonder what the house and garden behind the high hedging are like. Sadly as you went along, you couldn’t tell, as the sides of the garden were as overgrown as the front boundary…

Matt’s arrival was precluded by the racket of a car driving along the main road of Tideswell. People stopped and looked for the cause of the noise, and upon hearing it, most waved their arms frantically at the driver, who bizarrely carried on in blissful ignorance. He had two bikes attached to the back of the car, and one had dropped down, for its handlebars to be dragging along the road surface. I hope he pulled over eventually, as he’d have no handlebars left once he hit the 50mph zones!

Nevertheless, Matt’s arrival was the main event. You see, Tideswell has special significance for us. We both love the outdoors and country walks, and after talking online, we eventually met at the sort-of midway point between our homes, in Tideswell. It was a freezing cold January morning, snow was forecast, but we thought “what the heck, let’s do this!” We made it around halfway around the designated walk (I had a map) before the snowflakes started to descend, and quite rapidly it became a blizzard, blocking out the view all around us. Too late – we were too far to turn back.

It was great fun, even if my mobile did run out of battery, leading me to worry that my mum would be worrying as to my whereabouts and wellbeing. I got back to my car, said a hasty goodbye, and left a confused and then pessimistic Matthew behind to make his own journey over to Lymm. Not even the chance of a coffee or cake. Whoops.

Well I obviously made it clear I did actually want to see him a second time, as we were on date number two by the Saturday (two days later!).

But here we are, in a less freezing photo, from a carved stone bench at the midway point of the walk we re-enacted for the most part this weekend:

The route we followed this time takes you down out of Tideswell and along Brook Head into Miller’s Dale (on the banks of the River Wye). You go from passing cheerful local dog walkers to encountering hikers and razor-keen rock climbers, tackling the sheer faces of the cliffs.

You go through the post-industrial houses and apartments of Litton Mill…

…and on until you reach Cressbrook.

Here we deviated from our winter route and kept to the country lanes, heading high up through Cressbrook and past it’s Hall (whose gardens are usually open, £2.50 for adults, but typically not on a Saturday – bad luck!). The sun shone and the grey stone cottages looked characterful and magical. Even the most simple and pragmatic of old properties around the area appealed to me, and Matt too.


Our end goal (besides our cars in Tideswell, of course!) was the little village of Litton and its pub for a spot of late lunch. It’s called The Red Lion and if you want to visit a small country pub retaining its separate rooms and so its original personality, go there! The bar lady (I’m not sure if she was also the landlady, actually) was friendly and enthusiastic, and the food was delicious (and that was just cheddar and tomato chutney sandwiches and fat chips in our case). I wouldn’t mind it being my local.

We followed up our lunch with coffee and cake across the village green and road at the little store. The proprietors here were friendly too. In fact, I can’t think of coming across any bad sorts while out there. The range of cakes on offer was fantastic too: Matt had carrot cake, I had a raspberry and pistachio frangipane tart, but there was coffee cake, chocolate cake, brownies…. The list goes on. Carrot cake is only available one day a week though – be warned!

We polished off the day by visiting three of the pubs down in Tideswell, although we were both sadly disappointed by the George Inn and The Star Inn. They seemed popular with residents, but they had been “modernised” (read: painted neutrals, greens and magentas) and had lost any sort of character.

The last pub, The Horse & Jockey, kept its dark beams and nooks and crannies, and was much the better for it. I wish we’d sampled their food too, but we were both quite full still from our lunch and cakes. Or at least Matt was. I got home that night and devoured an Indian takeaway…

And so it brings me to Sunday, and to typing this, before getting on with some garden designing and some pottering around. I hope you’ve had a fulfilling weekend, whether it’s been quiet or action-packed.

Always remember to make a bit of downtime for yourself though; we don’t have limitless power packs that don’t need recharging now and again.

Gardening addictions

Gardening addictions

How does your garden grow? Full of spontaneous plant purchases? Despite not having my own garden at the moment, I’m still dabbling with plants and produce in my poor parents’ outdoor space. They’re inundated with plant pots, and I’ve only gone and picked up even […]

Surprise surprise

Surprise surprise

Are you a fan of surprises? Do you feel comfortable completely relinquishing control? I’ve never been a huge fan of surprises myself. I think a lot of it was a safety mechanism – being in charge of what I do and when and where was […]

RHS Chatsworth Flower Show 2017

RHS Chatsworth Flower Show 2017

Picture the scene: rolling hills in various shades of green, embracing a soft valley as its river gently meanders through. Trees stand here and there as sentinels at their various posts. Their charge? A magnificent golden edifice hundreds of years old.

The location? Chatsworth House, Derbyshire. It’s a place I always slightly took for granted when younger, not growing up all that far from it. I could never quite understand the reverence shown around the rest of the nation.

Strolling into its grounds on June 7th 2017, I now comprehended. At the building’s feet lay the bubbling spring of attendees to the inaugural RHS Chatsworth Flower Show, and boy was I overjoyed to finally have another RHS show happening “up north”. I took Matt along with me to experience the spectacle.

The idea behind the show was pioneers in design, reflected in the modern day interpretation of Joseph Paxton’s long-gone Great Conservatory (the centrepiece of the show, if Chatsworth House didn’t completely steal the limelight) and embedded in the naturalistic landscape crafted by Capability Brown. Along from the show’s entrance gates were the extraordinary and somewhat extravagant free form gardens. I have to confess myself not au fait with these; I like my designs more traditional and down to earth, like my architecture. I rarely like to analyse a garden, preferring simply to soak in its beauty. The studded dinosaur skull I really did not get. More a failing on my part, I suppose.

The show gardens, though few in number and for the most part smaller in dimension than Chelsea, were much more up my street. The IQ Quarry Garden, designed by Paul Harvey-Brooke’s, won Best Show Garden and a Gold medal, although it was not my favourite. I loved the more planted up end of the space, but am no great fan of metal objets d’art or walls. Sorry.

I liked the whimsy and wildness of the Belmont Enchanted Gardens, but did not echo the judges’ sentiment of it warranting a Gold medal, and the wooden spiral staircase in its centre was a design piece too far for me. Pointless and rather distracting, and I overheard quite a few others say the same.

I didn’t much love the Moveable Feast garden either, yet have to admit that I felt the concept was inspiring and important. It was the grey plastic planters that just didn’t float my boat. Sadly, I found the inflatable Great Conservatory a letdown as well. It all appeared a bit giant-kids’-party-setup to me… Maybe the central “paddling pool” didn’t help…

My top three gardens on display were right next to one another. The Cruse Bereavement Care ‘A Time for Everything garden’ had an eye catching range of foliage colours and forms, flowing around the central stone wall and water seating area. Next up was ‘Just Add Water’ by Jackie Sutton (or is it Knight? I’m a little confused). Rockeries aren’t my cup of tea, but the addition of water to enliven the sandstone and naturalistic perennials to soften the construction really won me over. Thirdly was the ‘Experience Peak District & Derbyshire’ garden designed by Lee Bestall: a brilliant amalgam of the region surrounding Chatsworth, comprising its cattle, trees and wildflowers, haa-haas and neoclassical elements of Derbyshire stately homes’ cultivated corners. It also played with perspective subtly yet cleverly – you had to see from both ends to really appreciate the design.

We passed Adam Frost and Joe Swift on a couple of occasions outside, and we then headed on over the blossom-bedecked temporary bridge to seek out the floral marquees and perhaps Carol Klein.

Well we found the marquees – and they did not disappoint – although sadly Carol was nowhere to be seen. No time to dwell on this anyway, as there was simply so much to take in undercover and time was swiftly slipping away. I was determined to leave with something, and my plant of choice was the Dahlia ‘Karma Irene’, whose magnificent, flamboyant colour on the display stand just drew me in immediately. No flowers as yet in my specimens, however!

I could easily have spent a second day dawdling around the event, but it was not to be. I can say without a word of a lie that the show seemed a roaring success, and I’d urge you to get your tickets to 2018 if you get the chance (on sale from early August). Hopefully I’ll make it again!

Hare, there and everywhere

Hare, there and everywhere

I read on the Pentreath & Hall Inspiration blog earlier this year how the author, Ben Pentreath, was aiming to do one new thing every weekend. Unintentionally I have been doing much the same thing.This weekend just passed was a much more sedate affair, but […]